Visual Arts

The visual arts are vibrant at Fountain Valley, with a depth and breadth of offerings that kindle every student’s creativity. You’ll discover new talents and stretch your potential. Inspiration abounds, from the School’s beautiful setting and facilities, to the accomplished and talented arts faculty.

“The arts at FVS give all students the opportunity to foster creative thinking that can be applied to many areas of life,” says Arts Department Chair Curtis Singmaster. “We’ve had many FVS grads go on to top arts colleges, and we have guided and helped them to get there.” These schools include Pratt Institute, Rhode Island School of Design, Maryland Institute of Art, and Savannah College of Art and Design. 

Studio Arts

Explore creating in a variety of mediums: draw in pencil, ink, charcoal and pastel; paint with watercolors and acrylics; discover printmaking with wood and linocuts, silkscreen and etchings.

List of 5 items.

  • Studio Art I

    Studio Art I is an introduction to a variety of studio media. The course covers the foundations of perspective, anatomy, and acrylic painting. All students must participate in peer critiques and participate in the final art show at the end of the semester. Students work on their choice of drawing (pencil, ink, pastel, charcoal), painting (watercolor, acrylic), and printmaking (wood and linocuts, silkscreen, etching).
     
  • Studio Art II

    Prerequisite: Studio Art I
    This course is available to Studio Art students who have completed Intro to Studio Art or its equivalent. Students may take Advanced Studio Art for as many semesters as they desire. Each successive semester offers the student the opportunity to work in an increasingly independent fashion and in more advanced techniques. Students have the choice of working with the full range of available 2-D studio media with varying technical instruction in painting, drawing, printmaking, mixed-media, digital and other art media. All students must participate in peer critiques and participate in the final art show at the end of the semester.
  • Studio Art III

    Prerequisite: Studio Art II
    This course is available to Studio Art students who have completed Studio Art II or its equivalent. Each successive semester offers the student the opportunity to work in an increasingly independent fashion and in more advanced techniques. Students have the choice of working with the full range of available 2-D studio media with varying technical instruction in painting, drawing, printmaking, mixed-media, digital and other art media. All students must participate in peer critiques and participate in the final art show at the end of the semester.
     
  • Honors Studio Art

    Prerequisite: Studio Art II and teacher recommendation
    The honors level studio art course is designed for students seriously interested in continuing in studio art with a goal of proceeding into the Advanced portfolio course the following year.  Students work more independently and explore more advanced techniques. Students have the choice of working with the full range of available 2-D studio media with varying technical instruction in painting, drawing, printmaking, mixed-media, digital and other art media. All students participate in peer critiques and participate in the final art show at the end of the semester.
     
  • Advanced Art Portfolio Studio

    Prerequisite: teacher approved (student must be in good academic standing, show a commitment to the arts, and have completed at least 1 semester of Honors Studio Art)
    Students enrolled in the Advanced Art Portfolio course are required to submit a portfolio at the end of the year. Advanced Art Portfolio is a year long course designed for students who are seriously interested in the creating an extensive portfolio of 2-D work. Expectations for the quality of work are set at the college level, and students are admitted to this course through a demonstration of superior effort and achievement, self-motivation, and previous art experience. The portfolio will consist of approximately 16-25 works of art. Advanced Art Portfolio students work with the teacher to create their own syllabus for the year, and then create the majority of their work independently.  One on one and group critiques will be used for feedback. All work will be documented and presented in the form of a webpage.
     

List of 1 members.

  • Photo of Addison Green

    Addison Green 

    Fine Arts Faculty - Studio Art
    (719) 391-5351

Ceramics

Clay has infinite potential for self-expression. As your skills build, learn wheel throwing, glazing and firing, while creating forms that have your individual mark of creativity. 

List of 4 items.

  • Advanced Art Portfolio 3-D

    Prerequisite: teacher-approved (student must be in good academic standing, show a commitment to the arts, and have completed all levels of ceramics/pottery or all levels of metals)
    Students enrolled in the Advanced Art Portfolio course are required to submit a portfolio at the end of the year. Advanced Art Portfolio is a year-long course designed for students who are seriously interested in creating an extensive portfolio of 3-D work. Expectations for the quality of work are set at the college level, and students are admitted to this course through a demonstration of superior effort,  achievement, self-motivation, and previous art experience. Advanced Art Portfolio students work with the teacher to create their own syllabus for the year, and then create the majority of their work independently. One on one and group critiques will be used for feedback. All work will be documented and presented in the form of a webpage.
  • Ceramics I

    The ceramics I course is designed to help the beginning student become more aware of the potential of clay as a vehicle for self-expression. Students create forms that may serve practical needs, yet have the mark of vitality and individuality. Students learn the basic handbuilding techniques that will give them a foundation to grow from. The elements of art and principles of design are used to help students gain a better understanding of design concepts and to help them self critique. 
  • Ceramics II: Sculpting With Clay (20-21)

    Ceramics II Sculpting With Clay is available to those students who have completed the ceramics I course and desire a focused opportunity to explore sculpture with the medium of clay. Advanced sculpture techniques are explored along with a more in-depth dialogue around form, shape, texture and concepts.  Projects include a bust, slip casting and large scale murals. Students will also become more versed in the multitude of glazing and firing processes utilized within the ceramics program. (This class is offered every other year.)
     
  • Pottery I & II

    The pottery I and pottery II class teaches beginning and intermediate techniques in wheel throwing. Students will learn to create functional ware while working on the potter’s wheel. Pottery one students start by learning to throw basic cylinders and then expand from there. Additional Pottery I projects include bowls, pitchers, vases, plates and basic glazing techniques. Pottery II students focus on more advanced shapes, larger pieces, throwing different types of lids, and more advanced glaze techniques. (This class is offered every other year.)

List of 1 members.

  • Photo of Curtis Singmaster

    Curtis Singmaster 

    Fine Arts Department Chair, Fine Arts Faculty - Ceramics, Metalsmithing, Varsity Boys Lacrosse Head

Photography

You’ll have the opportunity to learn through the lens of either film or digital photography. Emphasis is placed on the expressive and creative qualities of photography as an art form. Learn to develop film in a darkroom or explore digital darkroom techniques.

List of 4 items.

  • Darkroom Photography

    This course serves as an introduction to photography with the primary emphasis placed on the effective use of film cameras and learning appropriate darkroom techniques. Students learn the correct use of film cameras, film development, and processing images in the darkroom. Some of the photographic concepts that are explored include shallow depth of field, composition, and portraits. Emphasis is placed on the expressive and creative qualities of photography as an art form.
     
  • Digital Photography

    This course serves as an introduction to digital photography with the primary emphasis placed on the effective use of digital cameras and learning appropriate digital darkroom techniques. Some of the photographic concepts that are explored include color theory, flash vs. natural light, and documentary photography. Emphasis is placed on the expressive and creative qualities of digital photography as an art form.
  • Photography II

    Prerequisite: Darkroom Photography & Digital Photography
    Photography II builds off of the analogue and digital level one photography courses. Offering each student the opportunity to complete three “experiments” each in a different medium: analogue, digital, and alternative processes. Students research a variety of photographic methods and styles, individually decide on three projects to pursue, and create a website to showcase their work. The culmination of the course is a 10-15 image series. This cohesive final body of work, accompanied by an artist statement, also goes on their website as well as in a small group show of advanced photography at the end of the term. The course allows students a window into the working process of a fine art photographer, and is an excellent opportunity for building college level portfolio work.
     
    
  • Advanced Art Portfolio Photography

    Prerequisite: teacher approved (student must be in good academic standing, show a commitment to the arts, and have completed all levels of photography)
    This advanced course is designed for students who have completed all levels of photography (or equivalent) and are intent on building a portfolio for use in applying to college with the intent to focus in the arts. Each student will produce two or more bodies of work ranging from 15-30 prints. This is an ideal opportunity for the self-motivated young artist looking to solidify their skills and refine their portfolio for the college process.

Savian J. ’20: Final Project

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  • Photo of Chris Hutchinson

    Chris Hutchinson 

    Fine Arts Faculty - Photography, Media Team Instructor
    (719) 391-5271

Film

Produce short films from the ground up learning all aspects of filmmaking: screenwriting, directing, shooting, editing and acting. You’ll experience the creative, technical and collaborative process while exploring film’s visual storytelling toolkit. 

List of 3 items.

  • Filmmaking I

    This course serves as an introduction to digital filmmaking. Students have the opportunity to experience all aspects of filmmaking - screenwriting, directing, shooting, editing, and acting. This course is project-based, culminating in a short 2-5 minute film, that allows the students to experience the entire creative, technical, and collaborative process of filmmaking.
  • Filmmaking II

    Prerequisite: Filmmaking I
    Filmmaking II builds on Filmmaking I’s visual storytelling toolkit and focuses on producing individual short films from the ground up. Students work to create unique short films with an emphasis on character and screenplay. Final films range from five to fifteen-minute shorts. Taking their stories from idea to screenplay and then on to production, each student is challenged to play a wide range of roles in bringing their films to fruition. Creative manipulation of film is achieved through the use of Adobe Premiere and After-Effects.
  • Advanced Art Portfolio Film

    Prerequisite:  teacher approved (student must be in good academic standing, show a commitment to the arts, and have completed all levels of film)
    Built as the extension to Film II, Advanced Portfolio Film focuses on the production of one or more short films with the purpose of building a competitive film portfolio for use in applying to college with an emphasis on the arts.This course focuses more on refining visual storytelling skills and facilitating the cultivation of higher level practices both conceptually as well as technically.
     

List of 1 members.

  • Photo of Chris Hutchinson

    Chris Hutchinson 

    Fine Arts Faculty - Photography, Media Team Instructor
    (719) 391-5271

Metalsmithing

Start with fundamental techniques of sawing, piercing, soldering, stone-setting, fold-forming, hollow construction and cold fabrication while crafting jewelry and sculpture. As your skills progress, move on to advanced techniques toward the goal of fine craftsmanship.

List of 3 items.

  • Studio Metalsmithing

    Metalsmithing is available to beginning students who wish to explore a variety of traditional and contemporary forming and finishing techniques associated with jewelry design and metal fabrication. Using silver, copper and nickel silver as the primary materials, students learn soldering, overlay, enameling, casting, stone setting, hollow construction and cold fabrication techniques that are used in the design of original works of art
  • Advanced Metalsmithing

    Advanced Metalsmithing is available to those students who have completed the beginning metalsmithing course and desire a more intensive and independent opportunity to explore jewelry design and metal fabrication. Students are introduced to hinge-making, forging, lapidary, etching, and if desired, more complex processes of casting and large scale sculptural construction.
  • AP Studio Art: 3D

    AP Studio Art: 3D, usually part of a two-year sequence, is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art, and metalsmithing is one of the options students can pursue. Students submit an extensive portfolio of work for evaluation. Expectations for the quality of work are set at the college level, and students are admitted to this course through a demonstration of superior effort and achievement, self-motivation and previous art experience. The portfolio will consist of approximately 30 works of art that excel in concept, composition and execution. Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the corresponding AP exam in May.

List of 1 members.

  • Photo of Curtis Singmaster

    Curtis Singmaster 

    Fine Arts Department Chair, Fine Arts Faculty - Ceramics, Metalsmithing, Varsity Boys Lacrosse Head

Woodworking

Venture into the world of Hand Tool Woodworking to learn lost arts like creating mortise and tenon and dovetail joints. Unlike regular "shop" classes though, this course provides a more traditional take on furniture building and traditional carpentry as a whole—without the use of power tools! The result? Tables, picture frames, mid-century modern bookshelves, or whatever else you might dream up in as long as it's made of wood!

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  • Hand Tool Woodworking

    In Hand Tool Woodworking, students will build projects and small pieces of furniture using traditional techniques and wood joinery. Keeping with pre‑industrial traditions of woodworking, students will learn to shape wood in this course using many of the same hand tools that craftsmen have relied on since the 1st century. Students will be exposed to the distinct tools and techniques developed in the United States, Japan, and Europe. The course will consist of seven major foci; history and culture of woodworking, wood anatomy and identification, tool anatomy and care, design, joinery, finishing, and safety. As students are introduced to these foci, they will work on a number of small projects chosen to emphasize specific tools, techniques, and wood types.

List of 1 members.

  • Photo of Jeff Lamson

    Jeff Lamson 

    English Faculty; History Faculty
    (719) 391-5375
FVS is a private, college-preparatory, co-ed, day and boarding school for grades 9-12 in Colorado Springs.
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